Winners and Loser from Eyjafjallajokull

Some of the economic impacts of the flights being suspended to Europe.  Eyjafjallajokull volcano via BBC:

A drop of between 1% and 2% for European economies is not being ruled out. "That would mean a lot of European countries wouldn't get any growth this year," said Chatham House senior economic fellow Vanessa Rossi. 
The Losers
 The Airlines
The most direct casualty of the ash is the airline industry. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) estimates that airlines are collectively losing £130m per day in lost revenues. If the disruption persists for several weeks, total losses could run into billions, having a catastrophic effect on an industry already set to lose £1.4bn this year.

Meanwhile, major courier companies FedEx, DHL and TNT have reported delays and disruption to their services.

Travel Companies
Travel companies are also losing out. TUI, the owner of First Choice and Thomas Cook and Europe's biggest travel operator, says it is losing between £5m and £6m a day. The Prime Minister Gordon Brown admitted the problem was so serious that financial help for airlines would be considered.
Trade Companies
International trade relies more heavily on road, rail and sea freight than it does on air freight. For example, just 1% of the UK's trade, by volume, is carried by air. Exporters of perishable goods, such as flowers, are being badly affected. Food exports from Africa and the Caribbean are among those hit, with reports of Kenyan farmers being forced to dump stocks of fresh food and flowers destined for European consumers. 
According to a report in Kenya's Daily Nation newspaper, the Kenyan economy is losing $3.8m a day as a result of flight cancellations to Europe. That scale of losses is expected to be repeated in agriculture-based economies across Africa and South America.

Retail Groceries

Supermarkets' supplies of some fresh produce could soon be affected, though no problems have yet been reported by UK retailers.
Tourism
The impact on the tourism industry is expected to be relatively small, if the disruption lasts no longer than a few days. As Howard Archer, chief UK and Europe Economist at IHS Global Insight, points out, it is currently not a peak time for tourism in Europe. Although the tourism industry will lose money from customers unable to make the trip, stranded passengers unable to return home will also be forced to spend more money than expected - offsetting some of those losses. Prolonged disruption could have a much greater impact on tourism, however, especially in the run-up to the busier summer months. 
Taxpayers
Does anyone actually think that the governments of the world won't open their checkbooks to bailout businesses that have problems.  The airlines are going to get a check for sure.  The flower store on the corner, will not. 
Other Business Costs
Businesses are also expected to lose money through cancelled meetings, stranded staff, and delays to air mail.

Productivity in the UK is expected to suffer due to workers being unable to return to work, according to the Centre for Economic and Business Research (CEBR). 
Other Business Costs
Businesses are also expected to lose money through cancelled meetings, stranded staff, and delays to air mail.

Productivity in the UK is expected to suffer due to workers being unable to return to work, according to the Centre for Economic and Business Research (CEBR).
Winners

Other transport companies
Ferry services have benefited from the flight restrictions. PO ferries says its services between Spain, France, Holland and the UK are currently either full or close to full, with extra staff drafted in to the call centre to handle the huge volume of calls.
Eurostar in particular has seen huge demand from passengers since the disruption began on Thursday. The company said it carried 50,000 extra passengers on Thursday and Friday - an increase of nearly a third - with services effectively full. Over the weekend, it began laying on extra services, with six extra trains planned for Monday. Train services between Scotland and the south of England are also reporting a big rise in passenger numbers, as are cross-channel ferry companies.

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